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Find a Way to Win: Focus on the Preferences that Matter

October 15th, 2014

Royals third baseman Mike Moustakas made two stellar catches in game three of the American League Championship Series, including a deep dive into the dugout suite. In a post-game interview, Moustakas was asked about the team’s strategy for game four. “Just find a way to win,” he simply said.

His “find a way” attitude reminded me of a business owner who did. A few years ago, I frequented a Vietnamese restaurant near a client’s office. My client and I met there so often that we had a regular table, a standing order and Tuan, the owner, greeted us by name.

The restaurant had opened about a year earlier and I came to see it as a midday haven from multitasking. No adrenaline rush here. We and the handful of other regular diners found ourselves speaking almost in whispers, not wanting to disrupt the peaceful environment. 

My client and I left Tuan’s place after each lunch with the same reflections: how much we liked the restaurant and Tuan, how worried we were that if his business didn’t pick up we might be looking for a new lunch spot, what a shame that would be. 

One day during lunch at Tuan’s, I noticed that the restaurant’s vibe seemed different. The décor and food were unchanged but the dining areas were buzzing.

Nearly every booth and table was occupied. The clientele was a mix of hip young professionals, students and seasoned business types engaged in audible, animated conversation.

I noticed that Tuan had made two changes in his operation. He had installed a fixed-price noodle bar which was constantly ringed with diners. Gone was the Vietnamese background music, replaced with Anglo rock. Those relatively minor changes had clearly made a big difference in his results.

I was happy for Tuan that business was good although part of me missed the way things used to be. When he stopped at our table to thank us for coming in, I congratulated him. He didn’t seem like the rock music type and so I asked him if he missed his Vietnamese music. Palms up, he shrugged and smiled his gracious smile. “Same one, same the other,” he said. “People like it, so I changed.”

Spoken like a true entrepreneur. Determined to thrive, Tuan took his cues from his customers and made two plays that increased his lunch business. The original restaurant culture he had created was familiar and comfortable for him, but when it didn’t work for his customers, he took the dive and adapted.

Being humble and open are attributes of both successful sports teams and successful businesses. Business owners can become so focused on their personal preferences that they overlook their customer’s preferences. Tuan found a way to win: be flexible and focus on the preferences that matter – your customer’s.

Would You Hire This Person?

October 2nd, 2014

I recently led a whiteboard session at Summit Technology Academy. This forward-thinking high school accelerator is a national model for providing pre-professional, college-level coursework for students interested in science and technology-related careers.

The session was like many productive whiteboard sessions – a sometimes messy, muddy, process. Getting to clear outcomes requires asking crystal-clear questions – and answering those questions with honesty.

During a break in the session, I took a walk through the hallways to incubate my questions. As I turned around a corner, I came face to face with myself.

A full-length mirror was mounted on the wall. Above it was the question: Would you hire this person?

Well, there’s a crystal-clear question. Most of us have thought about that question when it pertains to someone else. The students that call the Academy home pass by that mirror on a daily basis, and are challenged to answer it for themselves. How would you look at yourself from an external point of view and answer that question from an internal point of view?

It’s about more than just what you’re wearing. It’s the intangibles that the mirror challenges you to confront. Do you project the confidence and determination to do what it takes? Does that show in your expression? Your demeanor?  Can you look yourself in the eye and honestly answer, “Yes, I would hire myself?”  If you honestly answer no, what could you change? How could you develop those intangibles? 

Beyond the job interview, every business interaction is an opportunity to be hired. Lunch with a colleague, a sales presentation, informal networking over coffee or a department meeting – all of these interactions give everyone you meet a full view of what you bring to the table. If you take an honest, full- view look at yourself and challenge yourself to answer “yes,” you just might bring more to the table and get better results.

Take a look in your mirror today and ask yourself: “Would you hire this person?